how to start a music studio at home

How to Start a Recording Studio

12 Home Studio Necessities #1: Computer; The Best Computers/Laptops for Music Production; Back To Table Of Contents Sign Up. How To Choose The Ideal Audio Interface. Your audio interface is the heart of your home recording studio. While it may look intimidating, it’s nothing more than a fancy routing box. Nov 11,  · Start a recording studio by following these 9 steps: STEP 1: Plan your business. A clear plan is essential for success as an entrepreneur. It will help you map out the STEP 2: Form a legal entity. The most common business structure types are the .

Image via lorischneider. Teaching music is a necessary part of almost every working musician's income these days. If you have a good mind for business which you probably do if you already make your living via musicthere are many benefits to starting your own teaching studio rather than joining up with another business. However, getting started can be tough work.

If you're up for the challenge, then you're in for a bit of work. It'll all pay off in the end, though! Here are my tips for how to go about starting your own teaching studio. First things first: your new teaching studio is a business, and you have to give that business some sort of identity. Many private instructors simply go by their own name, which is the simplest option. However, you may also choose to create a name for your new teaching studio specifically. If teaching is your thing and what you really want to do, then this would probably be a good idea.

It can really help with branding and gives your business a certain sort of legitimacy. For many freelance musicians, however, teaching is just one of the many musical services they offer. If you fall into this category, creating a new name and web presence for your studio can really increase your workload basically like running two small businesses as opposed to oneso often, the best option is to just stick to your own name. If you are able to attain recognition as a player, your own name can actually be a good selling point when trying to attract potential students.

Where are you going to teach? If your home space is clean, comfortable, and well enough equipped, operating your teaching studio from home is a great option. However, this is difficult if you live with roommates or in a quiet apartment with irritable neighbors.

If this is the case for you, then the other option is to rent a space. Many music stores will rent rooms to how to start a music studio at home instructors to use for lessons. Though this is an extra expense, teaching from a location outside of your home can add a little more legitimacy to your business, and thus allow you to charge a higher rate to compensate for the extra rent.

Don't forget technology! Many teachers are finding students from all over the world through the use of video chat services. If you have the gear for it, this is a great way to bring yourself additional students. Deciding what to charge can be tough. Though it's really up to each individual teacher, you can take examples from other instructors in your area to give you a basic idea of what music lessons typically cost, and go from there.

When deciding on your rate, there are a number of things to factor in. Your years of playing experience, years of private teaching experience, amount of music education, and demand all play a part. Don't be afraid to adjust your rates once you start getting a better idea of what your time is worth, and as you gain more experience. Lay your lesson policies out clearly in writing so that you have clear agreements with your students from the very first lesson.

What's your policy on lesson cancellations and makeup lessons? What forms of payment do you accept, and when does the student need to pay? Are there specific dates where you don't teach such as the weeks surrounding Christmas and Thanksgiving? If your rates change, are current students affected, or only new ones?

These are things to decide upon and lay out clearly in order to protect both yourself and your what i gotta do to make you love me lyrics. The more you teach, the more things you'll find to add into your policies, so how to make nice tea sure to update them regularly!

Nothing says "pro" like preparedness. Are you using any method books with your students? If so, have a copy of each at your studio so you can refer to it and as a precaution should your students forget theirs.

Are there certain exercises or songs that you find yourself or predict yourself giving to almost every student? Rather than scribbling it out at the end of every lesson, digitize a clean copy and turn it into a handout that you can have readily available. Make sure your studio is also equipped with tuners, amplification if necessarya metronome, and plenty of paper and writing utensils.

You can never be too prepared! Now it's time to really get rolling. With the enormous number of music teachers trying to work these days, plus the plethora of online materials that are readily available for self-taught players, you need to figure out a way to separate yourself from the crowd if you plan on running your own teaching studio.

Why should somebody take lessons from you rather than the guy down the street? Of course, all of the factors that I mentioned above that you used to determine your rate can be cited.

What else can you offer students? If you have recording equipment readily available at home, why don't you offer recordings of each lesson so that the students can refer back at their leisure? Do you have any specialized skills or styles on your instrument that you can teach?

Do you teach what is the best dog breed for a family instruments? Are there other musical topics that you can teach theory, composition, songwriting, etc. Anything that you can use to separate yourself from the crowd will work to your advantage. Now that you've got a solid identity, you can start setting up a web presence.

If you're a freelance musician, this may be as little as an extra page on your website mentioning your teaching services and what you can offer.

If you're starting a new business identity with its own name, you might want to consider making social media pages and a website specifically for your teaching studio.

The easier what causes extreme cold- weather are to find, the more students you will attract! It's time to start reeling in the clients. Once you have a good number of students, it becomes much easier to attract new ones through word of mouth. However, when you first get started, you'll have to work to get your first leads. Ads on Craigslist and other classified services are generally free, and make for a good starting place.

You may also have some luck using Facebook or Google ads. Give it a shot, and if you find it helping, then it's money well spent. Don't neglect the power of physical advertising. Printing out a little flyer and posting it up in music stores, coffee shops, venues, and schools can help your visibility in the community. Don't be afraid to reach out to your friends and family to see if they have any leads, either!

Once you'e all set up and have started with your first few students, your top priority is to teach great lessons. You've pitched your service with some success at this point — now it's time to deliver the goods. If you've got a knack for teaching, your students will often talk about it to their friends and family, and word will start to spread about your teaching studio.

If you're still on the fence about teaching independently or working for a studio, here's some advice to help you decide. Dylan Welsh is a freelance musician and music journalist, based in Seattle, WA. He currently plays in multiple Seattle bands, interns at Mirror Sound Studio, and writes for the Sonicbids blog. Visit his website for more information. Figure out your teaching identity First things first: your new teaching studio is a business, and you have to give that business some sort of identity.

Decide on a location Where are how to start a music studio at home going to teach? Set your rates Deciding what to charge can be tough. Create your policies Lay your lesson policies out clearly in writing so that you have clear agreements with your students from the very how to quickly draw a revolver lesson.

Make your studio unique Now it's time to really get rolling. Establish a web presence Now that you've got a solid identity, you can start setting up a web presence. Advertise It's time to start reeling in the clients. Search Search Blog Get weekly updates on articles, gigs, and much more! Popular Posts. Follow Us.

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2. Decide on a location

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Hello, Mike here, and I am a composer. I will give you a quick and easy guide, with all the tools and equipment I recommend to compose, record and produce music in your own home studio. Here we go! First you need to decide where to set up your home music studio. Since you want to get a good sound both for recording and for monitoring your music, I recommend that you set up your studio in a dedicated room.

Here are some considerations for the room. Start by cleaning out the room completely, because the first thing I recommend is to treat the acoustics. Generally this means reducing the echo and reverb in the room so that it sounds more clear and dry. Here are some ways to treat the room acoustics of your studio:. Next it is time to choose your studio desk, which will be the command central of your studio.

You will need room for lots of gear and equipment on your desk. Also, even fully equipped you want some free space to rest your arms on, put your coffee mug on, and so on. This is something many composers and producers neglect when they start building their home studio. I strongly recommend you to find a really sturdy and comfortable chair that you can adjust in many ways.

Here are some considerations:. Here are the most important aspects:. There are many different DAWs you can choose. This is where you will compose, record, produce, mix and finish all your music productions. You can basically get any instrument and effect in software form today. Either as a sample library in a sample engine like Kontakt by Native Instrument, or as a separate plugin inside your DAW. Most professional DAWs come with a great bundle of included instruments and effects, which can be enough to start out with.

But for serious composers and producers, you will soon want to get third party plugins and instruments. Here are some examples of popular developers of software instruments and effects:.

The audio interface is the connection between the real world and the digital world, meaning your computer. Basically the audio interface has: Inputs to connect instruments, microphones, guitars and so on. And outputs to connect to your studio speakers and headphones. Next you need something to record your notes with. And while you can of course manually write them in with your computer keyboard and mouse, that is not very efficient.

Recording sound effects, voice over, humming in ideas and so on. And of course you never know when you will have a good vocalist available to record on your next production. Here are some considerations for microphones:. You either need good speakers or high end headphones when you compose and produce music. I personally recommend studio monitors. Studio monitors are basically special speakers that are made for monitoring your music with.

Here are some considerations for studio monitors:. Again, like studio monitors, studio headphones are made to have a natural frequency response for accurate monitoring of your music when you compose, produce, mix and master your tracks. Here are some considerations for studio headphones:. This is not essential for every composer and producer, since you can get basically any instrument in software from sample libraries and plugins in your DAW. However, I strongly recommend having at least some real instruments in your home studio to add that human and natural feel to your music.

Here are some examples of instruments you can use:. These are controllers that can help you speed up your workflow when composing, producing and working in your DAW. There are big controllers that can control lots of aspects when you compose and produce music, and there are smaller controllers with more specific tactile control over things like the transport section of your DAW.

Meaning: Play, Record, Rewind, Forward etc. There are even controllers to help you with the performance aspect of your music, such as triggering sounds, chords, editing samples and so on.

Here are some popular DAW Controllers:. Since you have read the complete article, I assume you are very interested in building your own home music studio. Now that you have learned my main recommendations for building your home studio: Make a plan, and follow it through. You might not have saved up enough money to build your complete studio setup right now.

But every journey has a start, and that starting point is now. I wish you good luck building your own home music studio for composing, producing and mixing your music to share with the world. The Room for your Home Studio First you need to decide where to set up your home music studio. Size : Larger is better both for acoustics and work space efficiency. Layout : Avoid a square shaped room due to worse acoustics.

Walls : You want walls that absorb sound. Avoid hard concrete. Acoustic Treatment Start by cleaning out the room completely, because the first thing I recommend is to treat the acoustics. Here are some ways to treat the room acoustics of your studio: Acoustic Panels : For example: absorbers vs diffusers. Bass Traps : To reduce bass build up in the corners. Carpets : Thicker is better, especially soft and fluffy ones.

Sound Blankets : Hang these on the walls, or even use blackout curtains. Studio Desk Next it is time to choose your studio desk, which will be the command central of your studio. Studio Chair This is something many composers and producers neglect when they start building their home studio. Here are some considerations: Neck Support : I strongly recommend you to get a chair with neck support so you can lean back and rest completely.

Your muscles will thank you. Arm Rests : Arm rests are great to reduce the tension in your shoulders. The only downside is that they can be in the way, especially if you want to record guitar. This will mainly depend on what your personally prefer, and more importantly the software you prefer to use both for music production and other creative work.

Which means many cores, and high speeds. The faster the CPU, the less headaches you will get. Drives : You will also need lots of storage capacity on your studio computer. But more importantly, you want high speed drives, because you will load big sample libraries from them. I recommend high speed solid state drives, often called SSDs.

I also recommend having more than one drive. For example, having one drive dedicated to your operating system and installed programs only. One drive to store all your sounds and sample libraries on. Another drive for backups, and so on. I strongly recommend it as an essential part of your composer and producer toolkit. Spectrasonics : Probably the most used instrument plugins used by professional composers. Especially their flagship instrument Omnisphere. Spitfire Audio : If you want to compose orchestral and cinematic music, they have produced a range of Kontakt-based sample libraries with exceptional quality and depth.

Audio Interface The audio interface is the connection between the real world and the digital world, meaning your computer. Here are some considerations when choosing your audio interface: Connection : USB or Thunderbolt are the most common. Check to see which connector and version is used, because you want as high speed as you can.

You really only need one mic input, one guitar input, and one stereo instrument input. Outputs : It can be nice to have multiple outputs. For example: with 2 headphones outputs you can have your producer friend, or vocalist listen independently on a separate pair of headphones. Action : From light synth keybed to graded hammer piano feel. Controllers : Sliders, knobs and buttons that you can use for controlling your DAW.

Here are some considerations for microphones: Type : There are 2 main microphones types, condenser and dynamic. In studio recordings a condenser microphone is by far the most common due to better detail in the high end. But dynamic microphones are better for very loud sounds, and also pickup less sound from the background. Connection : Professional microphones have XLR-connection.

This is the cable that you connect from your microphone into your audio interface. Mount : Either you can use a common mic stand on the floor, or a flexible arm mount attached to your studio desk. You also need a shock mount for your microphone, which removes the vibrations that otherwise would be picked up by the microphone. Without a pop filter those sounds will distort the audio due to the big burst of air. Studio Monitors You either need good speakers or high end headphones when you compose and produce music.

Here are some considerations for studio monitors: Size : Studio monitors often range in between 5 to 8 inch meaning the size of the speaker cone.

Bigger speakers can reproduce lower frequencies better, meaning that it can go down to the deepest bass.