what a levels are needed to become a doctor

What A-Levels Do You Need to be a Doctor?

You'll generally have to achieve the highest grades to study medicine. University of Birmingham: 'A*AA at A-level, including chemistry and biology. Predicted AAA at A-level. AAAAA in Scottish Highers and AAB in Advanced Highers including chemistry and biology.'. University of Cambridge: 'A*A*A at A-level. 43 rows · What A-Levels Do You Need To Be A Doctor? Broadly speaking, most Medical Schools .

In fact, some universities, like Brighton and Sussexencourage this to broaden academic horizons — and Hull York considers all third A-Level subjects to have equal merit. This was recently updated — but please always check directly with each Medical School for the latest information. With the cancellation of exams, A-Level grades will be awarded by teacher assessment instead. Last year saw a record level of top achievers at A-Level grade.

Discover the six secrets of getting into Medical School, with tips on how to succeed at each step! You'll receive detailed feedback in just a few days - with clear action points on how to improve! Impress Admissions Tutors at top Medical Schools, avoid common mistakes, and make your Personal Statement shine what is human gross anatomy tutoring.

Log in Sign up. Boost STEM grades. Jump to Section Icon. Twitter Facebook LinkedIn Email. University Which A-Levels does this school require? Which A-Levels are not acceptable? Aberdeen Chemistry is required. One further A-Level in most other subjects. Check with Medical Admissions Office if in doubt about suitability of a subject. Combinations of Chemistry, Biology plus a Non-Science subject are as acceptable as all-science combinations. They require a pass in the practical element General Studies and Critical Thinking.

Aston Chemistry and Biology. The third subject can be any other subject. A pass in the practical element of your science A Levels is required. General Studies and Critical Thinking. General Studies or Critical Thinking. Further Maths, if Mathematics is included in your A-levels. Birmingham Chemistry and Biology. Other non-standard subjects may not be accepted. Brighton and Sussex Biology and Chemistry are mandatory. Bristol Chemistry is mandatory and either Biology, Physics or Maths.

Third A-Level can be any other academic subject. Not Specified. The third subject can be any other academic subject. General Studies. Not specified. Cambridge Chemistry and one of Biology, Physics or Maths.

Check the college websites for details. Cardiff Chemistry and Biology. You will need a pass in the practical element. Dundee Chemistry and another science such as Biology, Physics or Mathematics. The third subject can be your own choice, there is no preference.

Edge Hill Biology and Chemistry are mandatory, with passes in the physical elements of both. Only one of Mathematics or Further Mathematics will be considered.

Human Biology may replace Biology. Exeter Biology and Chemistry. Glasgow Chemistry and one of Maths, Physics or Biology. Hull York Biology and Chemistry, with a pass in science practicals. The third subject, all subjects considered equally apart from Further Maths and Human Biology. Imperial Chemistry, Biology and any third subject. General Studies, Critical Thinking and Citizenship. Critical Thinking and General Studies. King's College London Biology and Chemistry You will be required to pass the practical endorsement in all science subjects.

Leeds Chemistry or Biology. While General Studies and Critical Thinking are welcomed as a 4th A2, they do not typically form part of an offer. Only one of Mathematics and Further Mathematics count towards your potential offer. This is the case with Biology and Human Biology too.

Lincoln Biology or Human Biology and Chemistry, a pass is required in science practicals. Liverpool Chemistry together with either Biology, Physics or Mathematics and any third academic subject. Practical science elements must also be passed.

Offers will not include combinations of very similar subjects, such as Biology and Human Biology or Maths and Further Maths together. Critical Thinking, Citizenship, EPQ, Key Skills or General Studies - although taken in addition to three suitable academic subjects could help strengthen your application. Science subjects must include a pass in the practical element. If a practical component forms part of any of the A-levels taken, we expect candidates to have taken it and passed.

Critical Thinking or General Studies. The third subject can be from any subject area including how to wash your hair with box braids humanities, languages, music, sport, science and the social sciences. Mathematics and Further Mathematics cannot be counted together. The combination of Chemistry and Biology is acceptable.

Southampton Biology and one additional science, with a pass in any practical elements. There is no preference for the third subject. There must include a pass in any practical elements. Only one subject from a combination of Maths or Further Maths or Statistics will be considered.

Swansea Graduate only. UCLan At least two science subjects which include Chemistry and any third academic subject. Warwick Graduate only. UCAS Preparation. Get Into Med School Discover the six secrets of getting into Medical School, with tips on how to succeed at each step! You May Also Like. Grid Circle. Grid triangle. Loading More Content. We use cookies to give you the best experience on our website, analyse traffic and show relevant content.

Read our cookie policy. Accept all cookies No. Chemistry is required. They require a pass in the practical element. Chemistry and Biology.

Biology and Chemistry are mandatory. Chemistry is mandatory and either Biology, Physics or Maths. Chemistry and one of Biology, Physics or Maths. Chemistry and another science such as Biology, Physics or Mathematics. Biology and Chemistry are mandatory, with passes in the physical elements of both. Biology and Chemistry, with a what does wsdl stand for in science practicals.

Biology and Chemistry You will be required to pass the practical endorsement in all science subjects. Chemistry or Biology. Biology or Human Biology and Chemistry, a pass is required in science practicals.

The third A-Level can be in any subject. Chemistry together with either Biology, Physics or Mathematics and any third academic subject. Biology and one of Chemistry, Physics, Maths and Psychology. Biology and one additional science, with a pass in any practical elements. Chemistry and one other from Biology, Mathematics or Physics. At least two science subjects which include Chemistry and any third academic subject.

What A-Levels Do You Need To Be A Doctor?

Becoming a Doctor takes lots of hard work and many years of specific training after Higher Education, but how will your GCSEs impact your opportunities in the field?

Which subjects do you need and what grades should you be achieving in them? What other qualifications might you need to become a Doctor? It seems likely that if you are researching the pathways to becoming a Doctor as early as the time that you are taking your GCSEs, that you are very motivated and focused, which will be beneficial to you if you would like to pursue Medicine as a career. In this article, I am going to explain which GCSEs you will need in order to become a Doctor, and how they will impact your academic path to becoming a Doctor.

If you want the short answer, here it is: In order to be able to become a Doctor, you will need at least 7 GCSEs, 5 of which will need to be at Grades You will also need to have pass grades at least in Maths, English Language and either Triple ideally or Combined Science.

However, it is important to note that these are simply minimum requirements, and Medicine is an incredibly competitive field, so ideally you want to aim for as many grades as you can, and avoid achieving anything less than a grade 4 in any subject. It is also incredibly important that, as a minimum, you make sure that your GCSE grades mean that you can access the right A-Levels which will allow you to progress into your career as a Doctor.

If you want to become a doctor, it is a very good idea to study Chemistry and Biology at Sixth Form, as these are often the subjects which are required by Universities Chemistry especially is almost always absolutely required by Universities. Although it is not necessarily required in order to become a Doctor, it will certainly make it easier for you to progress into the field, and you will find the A-Level subjects slightly more manageable.

If you would like to find out more about the specific A-Levels that you should take at Sixth Form to study Medicine at University, take a look at this useful article. Physics, Maths and Humanities subjects at A-Level are also often valued by Universities, so you may want to consider taking subjects which allow you to continue with these at A-Level.

If you were considering doing a Humanities subject at A-Level such as History , you may want to take this at GCSE in order to put yourself in a stronger position for the A-Level course. This is not essential, as usually the courses require you to have GCSEs in English Language as a minimum and History as a preference, but it will give you a better understanding of the subject, while also making sure that it is the subject you would like to study. For most Sixth Forms, you will be required to have GCSE passes in Maths and English Language as a basic requirement for any course, and if you want to do Science A-Levels you are often required to have at least a 6 in the subject area that you would like to continue with.

However, this does vary between Sixth Forms so it is important that you look into the specific grades that are required at the Sixth Forms near you. However, as with most subjects, this can vary between Universities.

Though, again, these can very easily vary between Universities, so it is incredibly important that you research each individual potential University you would like to apply to. However, it is important to remember that Medicine is an extremely competitive field, and so achieving the best GCSEs you can is something which will put you in a much better position.

Ideally, you want to aim for those grades If you can to show how capable you are of working hard and achieving high grades. After you have gained your degree in Medicine, there are a number of further education courses which you will need to complete in order to become a Doctor keep reading this article to find out what these may be , however they obviously vary depending on what type of Doctor you would like to be. Therefore, there are likely to be differences in how competitive the courses are, and therefore how relevant and important your GCSEs are in your time after University.

After you complete your Medical Degree at University, you will have achieved a number of qualifications which are more specific and valuable to you than your GCSEs will be including your degree and your Medicine related A-Levels.

Therefore, it is still incredibly important that you work as hard as you can when doing your GCSEs, in order to put you in the best position you can be in when progressing with your dream career in Medicine. Ideally, if you would like to become a doctor, you should have at least 5 GCSEs in which you have achieved grades You should also be aiming for a minimum of a grade 6 in Maths , as this will not only help you get into the right A-Level courses, but will also demonstrate your baseline abilities in the subject, which will be incredibly useful to show off to Universities — especially if this is not one of the subjects that you continue with at A-Level!

It is vital that you make sure you can get on to the courses that are required by Universities Chemistry in particular , so make sure that you are aware of what these are before to give you a good idea of minimum grades — though remember that the minimum is not what you should be aiming for! Technically, you can become a doctor with just 7 GCSEs which means you can get grades less than 4s in 2 of your subjects , though this is not an ideal situation to be in to say the least.

You need to be aiming for top grades in as many subjects as you can, as Medicine is so competitive. Without these, you will not be able to progress onto the right A-Level courses which will permit you to do a Medical degree. Becoming a Doctor requires many years of training, and therefore, you will have to gain a number of extra qualifications before you will be able to start working properly.

These vary slightly depending on the type of doctor you would like to be. After you have done your Medical degree, you will need to complete 2 years of Foundation training, and then after this, you will need to complete some specialist training.

For example, if you wanted to be a General Practitioner GP you would need to complete 3 years of specialist GP training. If, however, you wanted to be a Hospital Doctor, you would need to do years of specialist training after the foundation training. You may also want to take a look at this useful article , which explains all of the stages which you will need to complete in order to become a Doctor, as well as showing how long each stage will take.

This is a great resource for planning your career. You must try to get the best grades that you can all the way through your academic career, because Medicine is so competitive. A good Doctor should have a wide range of skills. You can develop some of these general skills at GCSE level. There are many lists of examples of skills which you need, for example on the NHS Website.

An example of a skill which you could develop during your GCSEs is your ability to collaborate with other people teamwork. Teamwork skills are something that are valued by all employers, as communication skills are incredibly important in any workplace. As a Doctor, it would be vital that you were able to communicate with your colleagues effectively and work alongside them successfully. Another example of a skillset which you can learn and develop at GCSE are your organisation and time management skills.

Throughout your academic career, it will be incredibly important to be able to keep all of your notes and revision organised, as well as to be able to manage your time effectively to let you balance academic activities with hobbies.

As a Doctor, it will be important for you to have these skills so that you can balance your work life and personal life. The school at which you get your GCSEs from should make absolutely no difference to your University application. The qualifications will be the same regardless of the school where you gained them, and therefore, the school is not considered by Universities when you apply. The same applies for the Sixth Form which you get your A-Levels from.

Universities will not have any biases towards particular schools or Sixth Forms. The important part of your qualification is the grade that you have achieved, and the subjects which you have studied. So, overall, you should not be worrying about which school you are at, but instead you should be working incredibly hard to achieve those top grades in your GCSEs, specifically focused on Maths, the Sciences, and English Language.

Facebook 0 Tweet 0 Pin 0. Table of Contents. Notify of. Inline Feedbacks.